USFMS is in the process of being translated into several other languages.USFMS is in the process of being translated into several other languages.USFMS is in the process of being translated into several other languages.USFMS is in the process of being translated into several other languages.USFMS is in the process of being translated into several other languages.

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Welcome to Kansas City International Airport

Welcome to Kansas City Int Airport

Welcome to Kansas City Int Airport

FMS is very pleased to announce the relocation of our company to a wide-body facility located in Kansas City, MO in order to better serve and support the expansion of our wide-body business in conjunction with our narrow-body a/c maintenance services. These added capabilities positions FMS to provide competitive pricing in this ever-changing and challenging MRO business model, establishing us as the U.S. Midwest point so we may better serve our East and West coast clientele as well as providing continued services to our strong International customer base. Please contact us to learn more about how FMS can provide a quality service, competitive pricing and on-time delivery.

Welcome to Kansas City Int Airport

Welcome to Kansas City Int Airport

Aviation Maintenance and Upgrades: Big Jets Visit Airport

2 MD-11 freighters arrive for modifications at local facility

By Bill Rufty
THE LEDGER
Published: Friday, October 24, 2014 at 12:22 a.m.

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RICK RUNION | THE LEDGER
AN MD-11 cargo plane comes in for a landing at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport on Thursday in Lakeland.

The plane joined another MD-11 freighter already at the airport for FAA certifications and upgrades.
LAKELAND | Lakeland Linder Regional Airport looked more like Lakeland International on Thursday, with two large McDonnell Douglas MD-11 air freighters parked on the tarmac.

Airport officials who have been seeking more business at the general aviation airport said they think the aircraft, which are being worked on by a local business, could bring more publicity and business to Lakeland Linder.

The airport handles large planes throughout the year, from touch-and-go practice by Coast Guard aircraft to large planes coming in for upgrades by one of the airport tenants.

During election years, candidates’ aircraft fly into the airport.

And these large planes, which stand taller than the terminal building, can only help arouse interest, airport officials said.

“Activity breeds activity,” said Nan Walsh, assistant director of the airport. “When a valuable tenant is able to bring in clients at this level, it helps everyone at the airport.”

The two aircraft, owned by Western Global Aviation of Sarasota, a relatively new air cargo company, were flown in for a stop at Florida Modification Specialists, a four-year tenant at the airport that upgrades, converts and modifies commercial carrier and cargo aircraft.

After the company is done with the planes, the Federal Aviation Administration standards office in Orlando will send inspectors to certify them for use.

Florida Modification is expanding to renovate wide-bodied jet aircraft, said Don Bruce, the company’s CEO. Right now, it has a total of six jets waiting outside what used to be a Piper Aircraft manufacturing hangar.

“We are working with the city to get an additional hangar that can accommodate the wide bodies,” Bruce said, nodding to one of the MD-11F planes parked next to the airport’s terminal. “When that happens, (likely around 2016), we could be adding up to 200 employees.”

John Graziano, Western Global’s vice president for technical operations, said Thursday that many aviation companies, including commercial airlines, are having maintenance work done in the U.S. because of lower costs and the higher quality of workmanship compared with having it done overseas.

“The climate in aviation is changing, and a lot of companies are having their work done back in this country,” Graziano said.

“Having a place to do maintenance without the cost of having to fly overseas was a key factor (in choosing Lakeland and Florida Modification).”

Pointing to a jet being worked on in the Florida Modification hangar, he said, “That company, Amerijet, had its maintenance and conversions done in Lima, Peru. This is Don’s (Don Bruce’s) first, and the company is moving its maintenance back to the U.S.”

FUEL, OTHER FEES

In addition to Bruce’s company being paid for its refurbishing work, Lakeland Linder itself receives ramp fees, landing fees and fuel charges, which total about $2,000 per plane for five planes, Walsh said. The aircraft will not be stationed in Lakeland, but it may be possible one day for the planes to return to deliver or pick up cargo, airport director Gene Conrad said.

With an Amazon.com warehouse nearby and manufacturers developing in the Lakeland area, he said, there may be options for the airport administration, which also is working to locate another commercial passenger airline here.

“This is part of our development program,” Conrad said. “We have ample property around the facility, and it would be perfect for cargo storage prior to shipping.”

He added that the airport now is capable of handing almost every large aircraft.

The MD-11F is a three-engine, wide-bodied jet airliner, manufactured by McDonnell Douglas and later by Boeing Commercial Airplanes when the two corporations merged.

Based on the DC-10, it features a stretched fuselage for more capacity.

Two of its engines are mounted on each wing, while the third engine is mounted on the tail.

Manufacture of the passenger version of the aircraft was discontinued in 1998, and the cargo version, like the ones now at Lakeland Linder, was discontinued in 2001.

But the aircraft remain popular among air freight companies, including FedEx, UPS, Lufthansa Air Cargo and others.

[ Bill Rufty can be reached at 802-7523 or bill.rufty@theledger.com. ]

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AC 120-92A Explained

Who does AC 120-92A apply to, and is it mandatory?

Changes to AC 120-92Aairplane

With the recent release of AC 120-92A, the FAA has made significant design and alignment modifications that describe safety management according to the structure established by ICAO. Although the content of the new circular remains largely intact from its predecessor (AC 120-92), the approach has improved significantly. The most notable difference from the old advisory circular to the revised version is its:

  • Clear definition of Safety Management
  •  SMS implementation expectations
  • SMS performance objectives
  • SMS design objectives

Is a Safety Management System Mandatory?

Of course the fact that it is an Advisory Circular indicates its voluntary posture, but its application is clearly spelled out. Stating its applicability to aviation service providers, both certificated and non-certificated operators, the new circular goes on to clarify that safety management applies to all organizations that are exposed to risk such as:

  • Air carriers
  • Airlines
  • Maintenance repair organizations
  • Air taxi operators
  • Single pilot operators
  • Corporate flight departments
  • Repair stations
  • Pilot schools
  • Approved training organizations

Regarding CFR regulation, the message is also very clear: AC 120-92A is not mandatory and does not constitute a regulation. Development and implementation of an SMS is voluntary.

One Size Does Not Fit All

Maintaining a theme of flexibility for safety system design, the circular “stresses what the organization must do to implement a robust SMS rather than how it will be accomplished.” The previously described application across all aviation service providers demands a system containing inherent scalability; the single business jet owner/operator, large corporation flight department, charter operator, and EMS provider must all find commonality and consistent applicability in their safety management system (SMS) design. Each aviation service provider’s business characteristics are unique, so for an SMS to add value it must be developed with that distinctiveness in mind. By creating a detailed process focused blueprint in AC 120-92A, flexibility is inherent. Although each SMS requires nuance, it must also be harmonized with existing standards and designs. This is especially critical when considering the importance of international recognition. Safety management has moved forward rapidly in other nation’s aviation authorities, and of course the ICAO Annex 6 has placed a requirement upon member states to regulate SMS. In order to meet those international expectations, AC 120-92A is completely aligned, in concept and format, with the four component/twelve element SMS framework promoted by ICAO. The framework presented in the circular provides functional objectives and expectations for each component and element, setting in place standardization for regulators, and internal and external auditors.

Building a Safety Culture

Keep in mind, SMS design and function can be effective without being overly complex. For the smallest operations, a paper system or log file that tracks safety information may prove effective. Regardless of the operations size, accomplishing safety objectives does require that an organization:

  • Conduct internal audits
  • Continuously monitor risk and safety issues
  • Review documents
  • Perform safety risk analysis and assessments
  • Review training

Of course, no safety effort will be successful without the commitment and dedication management’s “personal and material involvement in quality and safety activities.” Combining this management commitment with a way for employees to transfer knowledge, via timely report submission, of safety deficiencies forms the cornerstone of safety communication. If employees, without fear of reprisal, can report hazards, issues and concerns, as well as occurrences, incidents, etc., and propose safety solutions and improvements, then effective risk management is possible. Weaving these communications into the described processes contained in AC-120-92A will help organize the corrective actions and risk controls essential to every operation’s safety management.

Written By: Steve Witowski
PRISM Director of Safety Systems
August 24, 2010

FMS Customizations

CustomFMSFMS customizations for corporate clients.  We can modify many different aircraft to suite your needs. We can do a complete modification of the interior as well as giving it a new paint job or C check overhauls.

 

About FMS

FMS is the only heavy commercial aircraft maintenance & overhaul, modification facility at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport, Florida. FMS is a private FAA/EASA certified repair station. FMS provides variety of solutions for the Aircraft Industry such as aircraft customized and mandatory modifications, maintenance, inspections, cargo conversions. FMS specializes in complete airframe upgrades, maintenance, modifications, overhaul, inspections and conversions for a variety of aircraft.

Solutions for the Aircraft Industry

FMS offers a wide range of aircraft maintenance services, from Avionic modifications to Winglet installation. FMS can assess and perform the needed services to meet and exceed aircraft air worthiness. Contact us for a free consultation at (386) 986-8451.

FMS Capability Extension

amerijet

We are pleased to announce that FMS has received our C-Check certification from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for Boeing 727-100, -200 series aircraft.

Boeing 727 is a mid-size narrow-body three-engine jet aircraft built by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. It can carry 149 to 189 passengers and its later models can fly up to 2,400 to 2,700 nautical miles (4,400 to 5,000 km) nonstop. Intended for short and medium-length flights, the 727 can use fairly short runways at smaller airports. It has three Pratt & Whitney JT8D engines below the T-tail, one on each side of the fuselage with a center engine. As of December 2012, 208 Boeing 727 aircraft (all variants) remain in commercial airline, private and government service.

About FMS

FMS is the only heavy commercial aircraft maintenance & overhaul, modification facility at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport, Florida. FMS is a private FAA/EASA certified repair station. FMS provides variety of solutions for the Aircraft Industry such as aircraft customized and mandatory modifications, maintenance, inspections, cargo conversions. FMS specializes in complete airframe upgrades, maintenance, modifications, overhaul, inspections and conversions for a variety of aircraft.

About Lakeland Linder Regional Airport

Lakeland Linder Regional Airport plays a huge role in support of city economy. Lakeland is the largest city on Interstate 4 between Orlando and Tampa. Large industries in the Lakeland area are citrus, cattle and phosphate mining. In the past few decades, tourism, medicine, insurance, transportation and music have grown in importance.
Publix is one of the largest regional grocery chains in the United States with over 1,000 stores. Lakeland is a transportation hub. FedEx Freight & FedEx Services and the Saddle Creek Corporation employ over 600 people in the area. Other large employers in the area include GEICO, Summit Consulting, Rooms To Go, FMS and Lakeland Regional Medical

About Amerijet International

FMS Boeing 727 valued customer is Amerijet International. Amerijet International is an American cargo airline headquartered in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States. It operates all-jet cargo services to destinations in Central America, South America and the Caribbean. Its main base is Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, with a hub at Miami International Airport.

FMS’ mission is to provide high quality service through new aircraft type capability expansion.

About FAA

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is the national aviation authority of the United States of America. An agency of the United States Department of Transportation, it has authority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S. The Federal Aviation Act of 1958 created the organization under the name “Federal Aviation Agency”, and adopted its current name in 1966 when it became a part of the United States Department of Transportation.

Links:
www.fms.aero
www.amerijet.com
www.lakelandgov.net
www.faa.gov